Promax|BDA India 2008: ‘If it doesn’t sell, it doesn’t matter’

Television as a medium has evolved, and so have the expectations of clients who want better promos that yield results. Day two of the Promax|BDA India 2008 conference at Mumbai saw insightful tips from international experts, who unveiled the secrets, the rules, and the intricacies of the business of communication on television.

e4m by Rishi Vora
Updated: May 30, 2008 8:48 AM
Promax|BDA India 2008: ‘If it doesn’t sell, it doesn’t matter’

Television as a medium has evolved, and so have the expectations of clients who want better promos that yield results. Day two of the Promax|BDA India 2008 conference at Mumbai saw insightful tips from international experts, who unveiled the secrets, the rules, and the intricacies of the business of communication on television.

The list of international speakers at the conference included Paul Weyland, President, Paul Weyland Training Sessions; Roberto Amoroso, Creative Director of the Sky Cinema Channels, Italy; and Charley Holland, Chief Squirrel, The Charley Holland Agency.

Paul Weyland, who presented on the topic titled ‘If It Doesn’t Sell, It Doesn’t Matter’, shared four key elements to writing and producing creatives that can capture the hearts and minds of viewers and compel them to watch a particular programme. He explained that the ‘Uniqueness or an identifiable difference’ would get the viewer hooked to the promo. His second point was about ‘Emotional Headline’ for the first five seconds of the commercial to be able to draw the much-required attention of the viewer. Weyland also stressed on staying away from clichés, rather the communication should have elements that called for action among viewers.

Roberto Amoroso stressed on focusing on the brand rather than the product. He said, “Creativity is essential, but strategy has its importance too. The ideal mix for a promo would be 80 per cent creativity, and 20 per cent strategy. One should get the first step right; the critical step comes in when you have to implement your strategy.”

He further explained the importance of understanding competition and its positioning. “If you are aware that your competition has a strong history behind it and a unique recognition among its audience, it helps in thinking differently and not becoming a ‘me-too’ channel. Portray yourself as an original channel and be consistent with it,” he advised.

Charley Holland, who threw light on how to close a sale, talked about what inspired people to watch television and movies, and focus on the point from where audiences go from ‘Huh? to Oh!’ He also explained the ‘Slippery Slope Structure’, a model that evaluates the effectiveness of a promo. The curve is a reflection of the viewer’s response in the time span of 30 seconds or more of the commercial. The first step in the curve, as Holland explained, was the attention getting device followed by target audience identifier, subject line, reward for attention, closing of sale, and call to action.

Holland further said, “If you want to increase the ratings of the channel, as a marketer you need to target people who aren’t the regular lovers or haters of a show, but target those who need a strong reason to watch that particular show.” He concluded the day’s proceedings by saying, “The best promo is that which creates a need that could then be fulfilled by the actual product itself.”

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