Kids have emerged into an assertive consumer group, says KidSense study

So you’re buying a car? Or an exotic summer holiday package for the entire family? A washing machine, perhaps, to replace the one that’s, well, outlived its lifespan, or an air conditioner? Or Insurance, maybe? You’ve compared prices, specifications, colour, plan, features, whatever, right? And made a decision about what to purchase? Good. But wait. Don’t bring out that cash or credit card yet, because if your toonager or tweenager, or even your tot of a toothager prefers something else, chances are you will change your mind, give up your own selection, and end up buying what your kid prefers.

Kids have emerged into an assertive consumer group, says KidSense study

So you’re buying a car? Or an exotic summer holiday package for the entire family? A washing machine, perhaps, to replace the one that’s, well, outlived its lifespan, or an air conditioner? Or Insurance, maybe? You’ve compared prices, specifications, colour, plan, features, whatever, right? And made a decision about what to purchase? Good. But wait. Don’t bring out that cash or credit card yet, because if your toonager or tweenager, or even your tot of a toothager prefers something else, chances are you will change your mind, give up your own selection, and end up buying what your kid prefers.

So – and much more – say the findings of a study conducted by Disney, the leading media brand, and GroupM, the world’s leading full service media investment management company.

KidSense, which Rajat Jain, MD, The Walt Disney Company (India) describes as “ a strategic initiative to bring insights into the world of kids,” is a comprehensive single source study on Kids in India that combines both quantitative and qualitative research.

And why did Disney and Group M decide to venture upon this joint endeavor to explore the exciting world of kids in India?

Because kids have been largely ignored by the media and marketing fraternity due to their insignificance and their relatively lower spending power. Hence they have for long been classified into a holistic segment of ‘4-14 year olds’ which was rarely researched into. This led to the failure to realize the potential of this knowledge to create better and relatable products for Indian kids.

Says Jain, “The study was jointly launched to explore the world of kids and share insights with the media and marketing fraternity. Kids have increasingly emerged as savvy, sensitive and an extremely important consumer segment today. As global leaders in this genre, it is our responsibility to understand kids and provide a knowledge-house for all the stakeholders.” Jain hopes that the findings of this study would act as “a credible reference-point for the industry, our business partners and help grow the business in this industry as a whole.”

Ashutosh Srivastava, CEO, GroupM, South Asia, says, “The association of GroupM with Disney is all about unlocking value in this growing market segment of young consumers. An important learning for all is that kids like to be spoken to in their own environment – their schools, their play areas, their homes and their shows. Disney’s KidSense shows new realities of influence from this genre on purchase decisions in categories ranging from confectionery to cars and insurance companies.” In other words, if marketers want to sell more, they need to influence the parents through the kids. And how do they do that? Simple. As Srivastava puts it, “talk the kids language to enter their homes.” And if you want to connect with kids in the 4-14 age group, you’ll have to speak not one, but three languages. That’s right, but more on that in a bit.

Tags impact

Stay updated with the latest news in the Marketing & Advertising sector with our daily newsletter

By clicking Sign Up, I agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.