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Indian edition of ‘Scientific American’ launched

07-June-2005
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Indian edition of ‘Scientific American’ launched

The India Today Group has added yet another title to its flock, bringing in Scientific American to the country. Scientific American is the world’s first technology magazine published since 1845 and its Indian version is called Scientific American India. The monthly magazine priced at Rs 100 aims at bringing insightful analysis of the emerging trends in science and technology for the Indian readers.

Said Pavan Varshnei, Publishing Director, Scientific American India, “This is the first magazine in the country that talks about science and technology and concepts of emerging trends. Scientific American is not as technical as a journal and it’s not as basic or sparingly available as a newspaper. It bridges the gap between the two, giving the reader the apt information. You need a voice for the Indian scientific community and Scientific American India will fill the void in the science and technology segment of publications.”

On being asked if there is a need for such a magazine in India, he added, “We talk about a globalised economy. I think there is nothing more global than science and technology. Scientific American India will allow people to read about the emerging trends in the area of science. More specifically, it will allow the world to also see what Indian scientists and people in the technology field are capable of doing. Each issue will identify and deliver the latest developments in biotechnology and information science, along with business-critical R&D across a broad range of fields.”

Scientific American India will be brought out by the business division of the India Today Group that publishes Business Today and Golf Digest India, the Indian edition of the world's premier golf magazine, and markets Time and Fortune in India.

On its similarity with the American version, Varshnei said, “Scientific American India will be close to the American version. Anything that is published there will be published here but as we go forward there will be more content relevant to the Indian audience. Science and technology is not limited to a region or nation. So anything that is relevant whether it emanates from India, US or anywhere else, will find itself in the pages of Scientific American India.”

Varshnei said, “Scientific American has always had the ability to predict emerging trends in the future and influencers turn to its pages to learn about important ideas years before other media recognise their importance.”

Scientific American, which boasts of more than five million readers worldwide, is published in 15 languages and circulated across 20 countries. The magazine has had more than 120 Nobel laureates writing for it; most of who wrote about their prize-winning works years before being recognised by the Nobel Committee. These include Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Hans Bethe, Murray Gell- Mann, Leon Lederman, Francis Crick, Jonas Salk and Linus Pauling.

Varshnei said, “The response so far has been encouraging. We are looking at a circulation base of 20,000 in the first year itself. However, we are not talking about numbers but quality of people it reaches as engagement level on a magazine like this will be much higher, which is difficult to get. As for its importance, there is no other magazine where the president has come forward to give a message.”

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