Sanjeev Kapoor’s food channel’s success depends on the programme menu, say media planners

Sanjeev Kapoor’s food channel’s success depends on the programme menu, say media planners

Author | Khushboo Tanna | Tuesday, Feb 16,2010 7:18 AM

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Sanjeev Kapoor’s food channel’s success depends on the programme menu, say media planners

Celebrity chef Sanjeev Kapoor, who shot to fame with his food show ‘Khana Khazana’ on Zee TV in the 90s, is now all set to launch a food and wellness magazine, to be followed by a 24-hour food channel.

The monthly magazine will be launched in a joint venture with Impulse Marketing, while the food channel is slated to be launched in the next six months.

Moreover, recently, Capital Foods had acquired all brands of Sanjeev Kapoor to introduce a new line of products in the ready-to-eat segment, which includes frozen foods, jams, pickles and papads.

While Kapoor was unavailable for comments, exchange4media spoke to some media planners to find out about the viability of having a 24-hour food channel in a market like India.

Anamika Mehta, COO, Lodestar Universal, noted, “While this will be India’s first dedicated food channel, this concept has been successful in markets across the world. Also, since it would require huge investments it would be critical to watch who would pick up a stake in the venture. In my view, there is scope for channels that are niche and targeted towards specific audiences, as opposed to general entertainment channels.”

Mehta further said, “India is a food oriented country and Sanjeev Kapoor is one of India’s earliest celebrity chefs. There clearly is a market for such content, and with the right programming mix, it will have a potential to grow.”

According to Kartik Iyer, Managing Director, Carat Media, “At a general level, such a channel has potential, but definitely not in the short or medium term. I guess, we need to know the amount of money backing this venture and the support the channel will get in the area of distribution and marketing.”

Sidharth Parashar, National Trading Head, Maxus India, observed that while India did have certain special interest category channels (travel/ wildlife/ religious), a round-the-clock content dedicated only to one subject would be an experiment of its kind. “Mounting such a channel seems like a challenging task and a lot will depend on how interesting/ innovative the channel gets with the content to generate and hold its audience base,” he added.

Anita Nayyar, CEO, India and South Asia, Havas Media, on the other hand, felt that not only was the audience limited, the programming, too, would be limited, which would result in a lot of repetition, unless there was constant innovation around content.

According to these media planners, the programming for this channel could range from industry expert led shows, international programming from the US, the UK, France, international celebrity chefs, food critique, restaurant visits, food destinations, art of fine dining to history of food.

Said Carat Media’s Iyer, “The key to the success of the show would be how well it is marketed and what content can be created to achieve appointment viewing in the early days. This would create a buzz around the channel and would drive viewership through word of mouth, which would be very valuable for the success of the channel.”

Lodestar Universal’s Mehta pointed out, “The success would lie in subscription revenues, rather than mere advertising revenues.”

The competition for this channel is spread across GECs, news channels and even lifestyle channels as these days all channels have food related programmes. “The opportunity would lie in segmenting day part and programming mix to create a wider appeal,” said Mehta. “Even bands and slots catering to women audience are potential competitors for this channel,” Havas Media’s Nayyar concluded.

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