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Bangalore Mirror broadsheet version to change advertisers' perception: Rahul Kansal

Bangalore Mirror broadsheet version to change advertisers' perception: Rahul Kansal

Author | Deepa Balasubramanian | Monday, Oct 13,2014 8:01 AM

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Bangalore Mirror broadsheet version to change advertisers' perception: Rahul Kansal

Bangalore Mirror has donned a new avatar starting from October 10, 2014. Having started in 2007, in a tabloid format, Bangalore Mirror is now available in the market in the form of broadsheet. Bangalore Mirror, part of the Times Group (Bennett Coleman & Co), the idea behind this initiative is to pack the newspaper with sharper news.

Speaking about the significance of changing into broadsheet, Rahul Kansal, Executive President, Brand Function, BCCL said, “For around seven years, Bangalore Mirror has been the voice of Bangalore. It has been a bold tabloid, taking up causes of the city, ranging from potholes to crime to environmental hazards. This has struck a chord with Bangalore, with over a lakh and half readers embracing it. Consistent in-your-face coverage and some tongue-in-cheek writing also ensured Bangalore Mirror is a big hit with the youngsters - the trendsetters, so to speak. This has enthused the team to offer more. Thus, Big Bangalore Mirror. Double the size and louder, but in the same spirit of a tabloid.”

The tabloid that used to have a cover price of Rs 1.50 on all days will now be sold for Rs 2.00 on weekdays and Rs 2.50 on weekends.

The content and product will have more well-rounded bigger sections of national, sports, entertainment and city news. The ad placements are also expected to offer a greater scope for innovation, while standardizing the ad sizes with other publications as well. The broadsheet will have a minimum of 20 pages.

On questioning whether the existing advertisers have accepted this move, Kansal remarked, “Very much. Bangalore Mirror, while very popular with readers, did not receive commensurate commitment from advertisers. Its tabloid format could have given them a perception that it was   playing in a separate sub-category of newspapers. Moreover, advertisers often needed to make separate ad material in a different size, and this sometimes came in the way of its inclusion in a media plan. As a broadsheet, it will play far more in the mainstream newspaper advertising business.”

Bangalore Mirror has created a campaign that communicates the significance of Bangalore Mirror going big while retaining its cheekiness in coverage and content. The campaign is being executed with 360-degree brand activation such as outdoor, radio, TV, across multiplexes, print as well as sampling of the Big Bangalore Mirror in key pockets and reader segments like the IT employees. It is also extending the campaign on social media.

Kansal added, “Though Bangalore Mirror has been number two in circulation at various intervals, the tabloid size has created perception issues at times, and we are optimistic that changing to broadsheet will pave the way for faster growth.”

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