TODAY´S NEWS

HOME OOH Preeti Kalra

OOH Interviews

Preeti Kalra

Associate Director (Marketing) | 17 Jul 2014

The essentials can vary based on the activity and the audience it is trying to reach. Also on what the content is actually ‘selling’. However the one key factor that does underline this process is description on the thought it is communicating. Something ambiguous or untactful loses the essence and the audience gets distracted. Clear and smart communication is essential.

Preeti Kalra, Associate Director (Marketing) of Bayaweaver has grown up in more countries than one can count. She has a degree in Mathematics and Business and has worked for over 17 years. She lives by a simple philosophy; work only till work is exciting. In a nutshell, she is workaholic. She is now leading the marketing activities of Delhi-based Bayaweaver, which was incorporated in year 2013. The company has already rolled out its first flagship project, ‘Oh My God’ as an ultra-premium project, in Noida, Sector 129.

In a conversation with Abhinn Shreshtha, Kalra talks about using OOH as a medium to capture eyeballs and create buzz.

Q. When it comes to content in outdoor campaigns, what are the prime things you look at?

There are three major elements we focus on: communicating our exact content via copy which sets the mood be it a teaser, or an informational correspondence. Second: the visual element – which centers on how attractive and pleasing it is to the eye so that one picks up on this specifically as there are hordes of signages/boards present at any given spot. And third is the creative uniqueness – which sets up the brand-recall factor in one’s mind.

Q. What are the essentials that a brand should have for an on-ground activity?

The essentials can vary based on the activity and the audience it is trying to reach. Also on what the content is actually ‘selling’. However the one key factor that does underline this process is description on the thought it is communicating. Something ambiguous or untactful loses the essence and the audience gets distracted. Clear and smart communication is essential.

Q. What percentage of your marketing spends is allocated to OOH?

By the book each project is allocated a percentage and this percentage varies on the city it is being campaigned within, as well as if it is a new concept more needs to be put out to educate. I shall leave this at saying it is a fair and correctly calculated sum.

Q. The OOH industry is largely labelled as unstructured. Where does outdoor feature in your media plans?

We communicate through a lot of mediums. Having said this, outdoor media is one of our strongest and most widely used mode. I am not sure why it is presumed that this particular industry is unstructured but it is safe to say we have a yearly plan on how we see the evolution of a project and subsequently its outdoor branding. Maybe there is structure amidst all this chaos.

Q. Beyond innovation, do you think smart planning should be the ground rule while designing an outdoor campaign?

I don't think anyone thinks otherwise. However it should be noted that plans are meant to be kept flexible as market sentiments are fickle and ideas get poached very easily and replicated. So smart planning only exists till the time one keeps their ear to the ground and is one step ahead on pre-empting what is the consumers next desired step.

Q. What are the changes needed in the outdoor industry to retain and attract more brands towards it?

It is a mugs game and change is not as essential as up-keep: flexibility should be maintained for how a space can be used in multiple ways. It should be kept in mind that the quality and maintenance of these sites is crucial and vendors should be able to give clients well researched advice for the kind of traffic that uses the segment being procured. Correct and relevant branding works out for the person employing that space and long established relationships for the owner of the space. Other than that, it should be noted that outdoor branding is one of the oldest ways of communication; dating back to the eighteen hundreds.

Q. The outdoor industry doesn’t have a common currency. As a marketer, how much does this worry you?

Street Rules. We either get with it or get left behind. It doesn't worry me cause at a certain point this really turns into Darwin's theory of "survival of the fittest" – so it is a system and we all have to get savvy to survive it. Do I hope for a change and have an even playing field going forward? Of course; but then again this isn't the only or first area within marketing collaterals which needs a revamping.

Q. When it comes to hoarding sizes, does big always equate to better?

Big is always better! But I would say strategic positioning is crucial; Very very crucial in fact. So if the size has to be compromised due to fantastic placement – then big does not always equate to being better.

Q. How do you leverage emerging media like Digital OOH, RFID, ambient OOH, etc. as part of the overall strategy?

They all play into each other as they are communicating the same message for the campaign that is being reflected. However, each of these come with their own distinct target strategies, so depending on where one is and who one is targeting for what product – then leveraging all these forms systematically is the 'do or die' game plan.

Write A Comment