Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

TODAY´S NEWS

Some firsts but no surprises in Rado TVC

Some firsts but no surprises in Rado TVC

Author | Deepa Balasubramanian | Monday, Oct 06,2014 7:42 AM

A+
AA
A-
Some firsts but no surprises in Rado TVC

Fans of Hrithik Roshan and Lisa Ray were in for a treat, when the good looking stars came together for the first time for a Rado commercial for its DiaMaster Plasma Automatic Chronograph.

The TVC starts with Hrithik Roshan striding into an elegant hotel lobby, sitting down for a business meeting. Suddenly, as he reaches to retrieve something from the briefcase, he discovers it has disappeared. He spies a waiter walking away with it in the distance, and the chase begins. The action-packed hot pursuit takes Hrithik through the hotel corridors, the kitchen, down an elevator shaft and along the air vents in an attempt to catch the assailant. As Hrithik catches up with the thief, surprise, the assailant is in fact Lisa Ray, having stolen his briefcase in a ploy to lure him to a surprise party in his honour.

This new ‘mini film’ builds on Rado’s standing by encapsulating all the traits that make up a Rado watch. The film was shot over two days in various locations across Mumbai where Rado ambassadors put the Rado DiaMaster to the test.

The creative concept is by Publicis Milan and the Creative Director is Marco Maccagni. The film is directed by Marco Gentile and produced by Filmmaster Productions Srl.

Rado CEO Matthias Breschan said in a statement: “It is a great pleasure to see two of our ambassadors starring in this thrilling new mini-film. We are very appreciative that Hrithik and Lisa both found time in their busy schedules to join us in Mumbai and are convinced that their fans as well as Rado’s will love it.”

A Rado first, this TV commercial unites the two brand ambassadors for the first time. Hrithik Roshan has been a Rado ambassador since 2011. This is his second commercial for Rado, the first of which saw him rushing through the streets of Jaipur to get to a friend’s engagement party on time. For Lisa Ray, who joined Rado in March 2000, this is also a first. Donning a wig and beard as a disguise, she makes a surprising appearance, having remained incognito until the very end.

Hrithik Roshan stated, “Filming with Rado is always a lot of fun. I enjoyed every minute on the set and working with Lisa was a great experience.”

When asked about this experience Lisa Ray responded, “I am so pleased to have been involved in this project. Working with Hrithik and dressing up in an intricate disguise was a lot of fun. This was a first for me and I hope everyone enjoys watching it as much as I enjoyed filming it.”

Expert Take:

Shelton Pinheiro, Executive Creative Director, Stark Communications, said, “ Hrithik Roshan’s suave sharpness does add the panache and élan of a Bond movie to the commercial. The idea of a ‘Time to Surprise’ too works well in the context of Rado as a reward to the successful man who enjoys life and does so with a careless flamboyance. Yet the mandatory ‘watch shots’ seem forced and literally in your face. Perhaps Rado is still working out the fine balance between flaunting it and yet retaining its elegance as a brand in India. And a subjective grouse - the Hrithik- Lisa Ray chemistry could have been worked out better. All in all, an entertaining watch.”

Narayan Kumar, Director, Metal Communications said, “There is something new and interesting in the brand thought of 'Time to surprise'. It's a relevant promise too, heralding new and unexpected offerings from Rado. All refreshing, all good so far. But, hey, what happened to the execution? Nothing surprising there at all. The use of a celebrity, while understandable and possibly required, is pretty much normal. The main part of the film - the 'chase' - is handled pretty routinely, as in hundreds of films before. The way he runs through the hotel and reaches the destination is pretty much, yawn, normal. No real executional surprises by way of action sequences or stoppages or breathtaking shots here.

He added, “The feeling of manufactured intensity you see on Hritik's face is, well, manufactured because nothing in the sequences seems to warrant it. And the end part of someone removing their mask to reveal someone else has a well-worn air to it - from the seventies Hindi films. As also the not-so-distant two-wheeler commercials, when a 'man' removed his helmet to reveal a woman, full locks and all. And, bit by bit, what should have been a surprise turns out to be normal, after all. It's obviously something to do with the execution - nothing wrong with the approach or original idea. It still feels like a refreshing thought in the category and because of that, may still do its job of taking Rado into public consciousness. Just that the job could have been better handled with a bit more, er, surprise.”
 

Write A Comment