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Samsung India keeps up the emotional thread, talks taking pride in a daughter in new ad

01-June-2017
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Samsung India keeps up the emotional thread, talks taking pride in a daughter in new ad

Samsung India is melting hearts once again. This time the electronic giant is addressing gender equality and its latest ad is about empowering women.

The Sapne Hue Bade campaign this time follows the real life story of Seema Nagar, who was a student of the Samsung ITI/MSME programme in Jaipur. The campaign conceptualised by Cheil Worldwide went live on social media channels on May 30. In the two days since its launch, the ad has received approximately 13 million views on YouTube.

In the ad, Seema, a small town girl, grows up in a typical household that believes that women belong in the home. Seema wants to attend the Samsung ITI/MSME course but the family is opposed to her going out to study. However, her father, who has always treated Seema as an equal, supports her and ensures she follows her dream. One day, during a family celebration, there is sudden power shutdown. As the boys and men of the house fumble with the electrical fittings, Seema steps up and fixes the problem.

When the family appreciates her skill and talent, a family member says, “Now we will have to look for a hotshot groom for her”, to which Seema says “Let the groom wait. I have to first open my service centre in the village.” The ad ends with one of the male family members remarking to Seema’s father: “You are right, you have three sons”. And, Seema’s father replies, “No, a daughter is a daughter. I have two sons and a lovely daughter.”

Expert view 

Speaking about the ad, Prathap Suthan, Managing Partner/Chief Creative Officer at Bang In The Middle said, “The message that the ad delivers is good and the script of the ad is great. There are a lot of families in small towns that still believe in protecting girls by keeping them at home. My concern with this ad is if it will reach the parents.” The ad would achieve its full potential only if the message reaches the intended audience, he said. Suthan speculated that even with the current internet penetration spurred by the Jio revolution, this digital ad may still not reach the right audience.

According to him, the ad will be more effective if it is broadcast on TV, published as a print ad, or even trimmed down to one minute and played in theatres in small towns and villages. “That’s how brand Samsung can drive change at the grassroot level. Because for now, those who are watching are already liberated,” said Suthan.   

Deepak Singh, Chief Creative Officer, The Social Street, was captivated by the ad and said, “In India, the issue of women empowerment is relevant at any and every point of time. So, work on this topic gets noticed anyway. Whether it drives a change or not depends completely on how hard-hitting the campaign is.”

He feels that the ad in its current form serves its purpose. “The way the story is told will connect well with the Indian audience. After all, we are all human and have emotions and are well aware of our society. It leaves a good message that will make people think,” said Singh.

All praise for the film, he said he likes the way the film was shot and its casting. “Besides, the product is nicely woven into the story, which does justice to the entire effort,” he stated.

Six months ago, another ad from Samsung, conceptualised by Cheil Worldwide, warmed hearts and broke the Internet. The ad about Samsung’s customer service vans, on last count, had more than 100 million views on YouTube.

Samsung Mobile India began the Sapne Hue Bade campaign in 2016. The CSR campaign kicked off with the Samsung Smart Class program, which is a Samsung CSR initiative that bridges the digital gap between rural and urban India by providing quality education opportunities to children in rural India. The video was based on the real life story of a Samsung Smart Class student, Sadanand Ugale, from Chinchada, a remote village in Maharashtra.

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