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Raise the bar of creativity: Nandini Dias on television and radio

Raise the bar of creativity: Nandini Dias on television and radio

Author | Tasneem Limbdiwala | Monday, Jul 20,2009 7:54 AM

Raise the bar of creativity: Nandini Dias on television and radio

Speaking at the Media Review 2009, organised by the Bombay Ad Club on July 17, Nandini Dias, COO, Lodestar Universal had a lot to share on the television and radio mediums. In her presentation, Dias spoke about the evolving trends in television and how radio can be used as an important medium for promotions. She took the audience not only through the rearview mirror, but also on what was seen on the windshield for the two mediums.

Looking at the rearview mirror, Dias noted that television medium was the most under-priced market. Despite the slowdown, quite a few new channels had been launched. She explained that rating was a function of reach and time spent. In this case, the reach had increased across genres, while time spent had declined.

On a windshield perspective, she observed, “With the number of brands on air and the advent of more DTH players in the market, channel share has increased, thus monetisation cannot be far behind. While between the digital and analog deliveries, the digital home deliveries are actually better.”

Commenting on the programming bit, Dias remarked, “Across genres, 50 per cent have similar programming. In regards to movies, hit Bollywood movie ‘Jab We Met’ was broadcast across all channels. Thus, the reach has been similar.”

In terms of content, Dias noted that there had been a shift to social and voyeuristic reality formatted shows. Hence, the saas-bahu and K-series myth had been broken.

“Another trend that is invariably noticed is the genre adapted to smaller towns. Shows like ‘Balika Vadhu’ and ‘Bidaai’ have been showcasing social tensions and thus, appeal to the small towns. However, for the voyeuristic shows, it is more based on extreme thrill and adventures, which appeal to the mini-metros and metros,” she added.

Dias further noted that multinational brands advertised were both local and global. According to her, regional channels would dominate the next wave of television expansion. She also noted that the rule of being the No. 1 channel no longer held true, especially in the GEC space.

“So, are we going to continue to underprice ourselves further?” she asked, and replied to her own question, thus, “The only solution for this is that we as media planners need to raise the bar of creativity.”

On the radio medium, Dias felt that the medium had been able to monetise the growing segment of the day parts of listenership. According to her, “India is the only country where we see no local advertisers advertising on the channels, which are dominated by national advertisers. The radio network has been leveraged across the cities for advertising.”

She further commented, “Radio is now not just supplementary to TV/films. This myth is now broken, where radio as a medium has been used thoroughly in different forms of mediums like TV, press, OOH, events and promotions. Radio has been a part of all these forms, creating its buzz and awareness in the right way.”

Dias summed up her review on radio with two examples, first of a brand called Reborn in Sri Lanka, which was very well merged with radio advertising; and the other of Colgate advertising on radio.

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