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JWT Chennai creates a Mr Perfect for Nippon Paint

JWT Chennai creates a Mr Perfect for Nippon Paint

Author | Judy Franko | Thursday, Feb 15,2007 7:29 AM

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JWT Chennai creates a Mr Perfect for Nippon Paint

How do you launch a new paint brand in a country like ours that grew up with names like Asian and Nerolac, endorsed by top-notch brand ambassadors like Big B and Saif Ali Khan? Fact still remains that consumers are still confused as to who endorses what. Hence the need to break free and impose a memorable property in the minds of the people.

JWT Chennai Vice-President and Senior Creative Director Jonoo Simon hit the nail on the head when he borrowed from the charming style of Broadway musicals, and created a unique and unexampled brand ambassador called ’Mr. Perfect’ instead of roping in a star as the brand ambassador. Mr Perfect is a fantasy tale magician who comes to town with his magical brush and brings colour into the lives of Lady Laila and her family members.

A simple before and after story, this commercial is about dull and dreary life of a family that is suffering from damp walls, peeling plasters and fungus infested coroners.

The TVC unfolds in a novel way. A fully decked truck drives through the countryside with ’Nippon Picture Perfect Company’ written on it. The side panel of the truck opens and Mr. Perfect, the representative figure of Nippon, appears and announces the play that they are going to present. The Nippon Picture Perfect Company presents ’The Desperate Housewife.’ Mr Perfect’s troupe also comes on stage with a flourish. Mr Perfect opens the dialogue: “Lady Laila, she’s so weary, Lady Laila’s life’s so dreary; Ooh how her little heart aches.’

And now the scene moves to Lady Laila’s house and she is seen knitting inside a damp wall, and broken furniture. Mr Perfect continues: “It’s dry and drab, it pales and breaks... Oh how her little heart breaks.” The scene now shifts to Lady Laila’s daughter and the grandpa, playing card house. Both of them are suddenly attracted by a strange sound of something peeling off. A huge piece of plaster peels off the wall causing the little girl to run back and stumble right into Mr. Perfect’s arms. She says: ‘The family is falling apart’.

Mr. Perfect sings back ‘No, it's the house.’ Now Mr Perfect’s assistants come on stage carrying larger- than-life painting tools. The little goblins energetically paint the house into brilliant tones. Mr Perfect presents the transformation to the stunned family.

The little girl is transfixed and in total awe. Mr Perfect also transforms Lady Laila and her husband to match the décor and it’s their turn now to be magically surprised. The little girl expresses her gratitude and says ‘Thank You Mr. Perfect.’ Mr Perfect’s team bids adieu so does the family from their new-look dwelling. The curtain closes and the Nippon Paint logo appears.

Major highlights of the film is an excellently choreographed dance sequence by renowned British dance diva Yana Lewis who has to her credit shows with Bryan Adams, Elton John and some of BBC’s prestigious productions. Her in-depth knowledge and exposure to ballet and Western dance forms add to the production values immensely.

Elucidating about the film, Jonoo Simon says, “This film is a theatrical spectacle in every sense of the word. Against the backdrop of a fictional travelling theatre group called ’Nippon Picture Perfect Company’, the film, in an exaggerated theatrical style, narrates the story of a dull boring family and at the end, demonstrates how Nippon Paint makes its life ‘picture perfect’.

This film, produced by Manoj Pillai of Thinkpot Productions, Bangalore, is a potent mix of music and drama and is very different in its execution. ”While it’s a classic ’before-after’ film with all the usual trappings like the family, jingle, and a lengthy product window, thanks to it’s unusual theme and dramatic execution, it creates a powerful impact in the already cluttered paints category. This film wouldn’t have been possible without a supportive client and a brave producer who took up the challenge though we didn’t have lavish budgets.’’ Simon adds.

The initial response to the commercial, currently being aired in Tamil, has been more than encouraging. Different is the word I hear whenever anybody talks about this film. As a director, I could not have asked for more, I guess,’’ says Manoj Pillai, who also directed the spot.

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