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Cannes Lions 2007: It's Titanium, not Platinum mate!

Cannes Lions 2007: It's Titanium, not Platinum mate!

Author | Noor Fathima Warsia | Monday, Jun 25,2007 9:03 AM

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Cannes Lions 2007: It's Titanium, not Platinum mate!

Indian delegates and other media members were quick to let go of the Titanium and Integrated category, but when Japan can score here last year what is stopping India? This year, the category saw a Titanium Grand Prix and an Integrated Grand Prix. The jury speaks more on what sets the Titanium apart from the rest.

According to Jury President, Alex Bogusky, Chief Creative Officer, Crispin Porter + Bogusky, USA, “Titanium is the sanctuary for ideas that have no other place to go. It is not an up-gradation like Bronze, Silver, Gold, and then Titanium. That would make it Platinum, which it is not --- Titanium is different altogether, it is harder and weirder, but totally different. Dan (Weiden, of Weiden and Kennedy) knew what he was doing when he created this category.”

The Titanium Lion, which was launched in 2003, was a brainchild of Dan Wieden. After undergoing various changes, this year the Titanium category became the Titanium and Integrated Lions, wherein Titanium Lions and Integrated Lions were awarded to deserving entries.

This year, the Titanium Grand Prix was awarded to Crispin Porter + Bogusky’s work done for Burger King, while the Integrated Grand Prix was given to Vegaolmosponce’s work done for Axe 3. Was the work a lot better than last year, when only one award was given in the category? Bogusky replied, “It is hard to compare the entries from last year’s. But I don’t like a show that has such impossibly high standards that they can’t find a winner. The way I see it is that this is what has been given to you, now find your winner.”

“We had a shortlist of 25 entries, and we really loved all of them and then zeroed down only on nine that got a Lion. At the end of the day, there is not a single one that I am not jealous of. For us it became the most exciting category. These entries reminded me of some of the things that I had forgotten in every day work. Titanium paves the way for the future industry trends,” added Bogusky.

Speaking more on the trends that he saw from these entries, Bogusky pointed out that amongst the corporate clients, gaming was becoming big. He said, “Films have become a more sophisticated form of storytelling and really mediums like gaming have surpassed films. Gaming today has a cultural impact and there is a business model going there. I think there is a fundamental shift in what is happening and gaming is coming as the most challenging art form that I can imagine today.”

“Another trend that we saw was really a mish-mash of two technologies, where in the final product one component cannot exist without the other. I see it as a different category altogether where agencies have led the brand changes. We wanted to make a huge statement and we wanted to put more examples there of things like these.”

Some examples here are Earth Hour, Beach cricket and Axe where the idea came from the agency.

Elaborating on the importance of these entries, Bogusky said, “We lost our seat at the table for a while, and it was really us giving up our seats in the strategic areas and we are now scratching back, and these entries show that the clients are saying that it is OK to bring the agency back in the strategic thinking. They are doing a lot of good work.”

“When we took over, Titanium was a bit of a mystery and a moving target. The objective was to make it a category than just a single award. There was integrated and then there was innovative. Within Titanium, there is a higher standard of integration between may be a product design and such facets. It is on the innovative side that is in its purest form, and something that does not fit in any another category. Titanium is doing its job for the industry,” concluded Bogusky.

For the record, the Titanium and Integrated Lions was announced on June 22 at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival 2007. Not even one Indian entry made it to the shortlist.

India had sent four pieces of work for this category. These included O&M Delhi’s work for World Society, entry titled ‘Save the World’, and two works from O&M Bangalore --- one for Rohan Developers, entry titled ‘Rusty’, and another one for Hutch, entry titled ‘Incidents’. The fourth entry was from Ambience Publicis for Marico Ltd, entry titled ‘Parachute Advanced Massager’.

The fact that this is one of the toughest and most prestigious of all categories of the Festival is also seen in the number of entries sent from across the world for this category. This year the entries sent stood at 324 when some of the other categories had as many as 6,000-7,000 entries.

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